Society & Culture

A WA family makes a desperate plea as their disabled son, 2, faces deportation to the Maldives

‘My little boy could die’: Family’s desperate plea as their disabled son, two, is threatened with deportation to the Maldives because his medical bill is too expensive

  • A two-year-old boy born in Western Australia faces deportation to the Maldives 
  • The boy has severe medical conditions and requires round-the-clock care  
  • His visa application was rejected because his medical treatment is too expensive
  • The boy is not an Australian citizen and doesn’t hold a Medicare card 
  • Doctors fear he could die in the Maldives due to lack of treatment facilities

Kayban Jamshad was born at St John of God Hospital in Bunbury, Western Australia after his family arrived from the Maldives six years ago.

He has severe haemophilia, a bleeding disorder which stops blood clotting, and requires weekly medicines.

Kayban already needed round-the-clock care to manage spastic quadriplegia, the most severe form of cerebral palsy, affecting both arms and both legs.

The toddler also has a brain injury and experiences seizures.

Kayban’s mother Aishath Shizleen said her son is a private fee-paying patient.

‘He doesn’t have a Medicare card, he can’t access any public health services, so he is what you could call a private fee-paying patient in the public health sector,’ she told Nine News.

‘We’re talking about accessing or not accessing care, and that could lead to the death of my little boy.’

Health experts fear Kayban could die in the Maldives due to inadequate resources and lack of treatment facilities.

Doctors and friends have appealed to the Australian government to allow Kayban to stay here.

‘It’s just completely inhumane. He’s a little boy and he deserves to be able to live and to be able to live he needs to stay here,’ family friend Megan Fitzgerald said.

The family are not Australian citizens. Aishath Shizleen (pictured right with this three children and husband) holds a temporary skilled shortage visa and is currently working as a social worker in Bunbury

The family are not Australian citizens. Aishath Shizleen (pictured right with his three children and husband) holds a temporary skilled shortage visa and is currently working as a social worker in Bunbury

The family are not Australian citizens.

Ms Shizleen holds a temporary skilled shortage visa and is currently working as a social worker in Bunbury.

Her husband and other two children are on support visas.

The Department of Immigration has denied a visa to Kayban, but the rest of the family can stay here.

Under Australia’s immigration laws, an applicant for a visa will be deemed ‘not to meet’ the health requirement if they are considered a threat to public health in Australia or when their care will result in ‘significant cost to the Australian community’.

Full details are available at the link below:

Source URL: Google News

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